Last edited by Faek
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding found in the catalog.

Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding

Inger Holmstrom

Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding

by Inger Holmstrom

  • 388 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Uppsala Universitet .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Public Health,
  • Medical

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesComprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, 1145
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages91
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12854505M
    ISBN 109155452973
    ISBN 109789155452971

      Health literacy is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services.1 The wide range of skills that comprise health.   Over the course of two weeks, students care for patients, make home visits, experience the culture first-hand and gain a new perspective on their own beliefs and culture. While this experience allows for a larger than life cultural immersion, becoming more culturally competent can happen anywhere with a little bit of effort, Sawchuk said.

    Decision-making capacity. Definition: the psychological and/or legal capability to process information, make decisions, and understand the consequences of the same with regard to health care; Typically determined by the attending physician; In order to have capacity, a patient must have: Understanding: the patient's ability to understand the meaning of information provided by the physician. We must first realize that competence isn’t any one thing. Part of being competent means that you can assess new situations and adapt your existing knowledge to the new contexts. What it means to be competent will vary depending on your physical location, your role (personal, professional, etc.), and your life stage, among other things.

      Each competency includes a definition and the observable behaviors that may indicate the existence of a competency in a person. I. Competencies Dealing with People. The Leading Others Cluster. 1. Establishing Focus: The ability to develop and .   The resulting shortage of nurses is a threat to patient safety (Blomberg & Stier, ), which makes it important to focus on new graduates' perspectives in their transition to professional .


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Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding by Inger Holmstrom Download PDF EPUB FB2

PDF | On Jan 1,Inger Holmström published Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding | Find, read.

Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding. Holmström, Inger. The aim of this study was to map health care professionals' understanding of the patient encounter before and after an educational intervention that focused the way the health care professional experienced the encounter, and to.

Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding. Holmström, Inger. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.

ORCID iD: (English) Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic). Gaining Professional Competence for Patient Encounters by Means of a New Understanding.

By Inger Holmström. Abstract. Swedish health care is currently facing problems, such as lack of financial resources, staff shortage and dissatisfaction among patients and professionals.

Patients’ dissatisfaction was the point of departure for the present Author: Inger Holmström. This means the nurse and patient both contribute aspects of their values to the treatment, but also modify their values for the treatment plan.

Nurses are encouraged to become culturally competent by using cultural assessments and practicing skills for nurse-patient cultural encounters to enhance equality in patient-centered care for all patients. Campinha-Bacote's Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence among Healthcare Professional Revised (IAPCC-R) consists of 25 items designed to measure the cultural competence of health care providers in the domains of cultural awareness, cultural desire, cultural knowledge, cultural skill, and cultural encounters.

But what does "being professional" actually mean. For some, being professional might mean dressing smartly at work, or doing a good job. For others, being professional means having advanced degrees or other certifications, framed and hung on the office wall.

Cross-cultural competence refers to your ability to understand people from different cultures and engage with them effectively. And not just people from the one culture that you’ve studied for years. Having cross-cultural competence means you can be effective in your interactions with people from most any culture.

cultural competence. When we successfully bridge the differences between our own culture and the cultures of others, we demonstrate and achieve mutual understanding and meet unique needs. Campinha-Bacote’s model treats cultural competence as a process, rather than a result, and has five interdependent constructs (12).

Analysis of variance and median split analysis found an association between patients' perceptions of physicians' cultural competence and patient satisfaction with the direct clinical encounter. This means that residents have fewer patient encounters (read: a reduced opportunity for learning and practicing the skills required for patient care) and presents a challenge not only to the residents, but to the mentors who are trying to teach the ACGME Core Competency of Patient.

Patient care encounters are shorter and more efficient 4. Providers feel more empowered and engaged Cultural competence means to be respectful and responsive to the health beliefs and practice of diverse population groups. allowing them to gain a deeper understanding of their conditions and effectively manage them.

patients perceive him/her by judging not only verbal but also nonverbal communication. By demonstrating energy, enthusiasm, respect, empathy, caring, understanding of sensitive intercultural issues from the start, the doctor will be able to begin the rapport-building process that together with communication competence represent key skills of.

4. Directly engage in cross-cultural interactions with patients. Understanding that each patient is a unique person can help nurses effectively interact with patients. Nurses need to have the ability to explore patients’ beliefs, values, and needs in order to build effective relationships with them.

Participate in online chats and networks. Patricia Benner is a nursing theorist who first developed a model for the stages of clinical competence in her classic book “From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice”.

Her model is one of the most useful frameworks for assessing nurses’ needs at different stages of professional growth. The ACA Code of Ethics calls counseling professionals to “gain knowledge, personal awareness, sensitivity, dispositions, and skills pertinent to being a culturally competent counselor in working with a diverse client population.”.

At face value, this is easy enough to understand. But when it comes to multicultural competence, what does it look like to put this “head” knowledge. PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — The doctor-patient relationship is one in which delicate matters must be discussed with trust, openness, and clarity.

In some cases, however, a cultural gap can get in the way. With training, physicians can learn to gain greater understanding of how culture and ethnicity — both of their patients and of themselves — can affect the care they deliver.

Cultural competence is using an understanding of a culture’s behaviors, attitudes, and policies to create favorable interactions with patients in cross-cultural situations. 1 Cultural competence also encompasses building rapport, gaining patients’ trust, and developing strategies to combine a patient’s culture and positive therapeutic outcomes.

1, 2 New practitioners may find it quite. By definition, competence is a minimum standard — the basics of what is needed to provide a service or perform a task.

To have a positive impact on the sociopolitical needs of communities of color and to provide culturally responsive academic and mental health services to those same communities, a higher standard of counseling practice.

learners (competence, performance, or patient outcomes).” So, it is acceptable to identify knowledge as the underlying need of the professional practice gap, but the provider will be expected to measure any change in terms of competence, performance, or patient outcomes. To measure competence, for example, the provider might assess.

Developing rapport and gaining patient trust relies on understanding. When patient and doctor do not speak the same language, there is less opportunity to develop rapport or use "small talk" to obtain a comprehensive patient history, learn relevant clinical information, or .Gaining cultural competence is a lifelong process of increasing self-awareness, developing social skills and behaviors around diversity, and gaining the ability to advocate for others.

It goes beyond tolerance, which implies that one is simply willing to overlook differences. The mean number of patient encounters by students rated as competent was significantly higher than the mean number of patient encounters by students rated as not competent (p.